I left my role of editor of the Journal of Open Archaeology Data

After serving for 7 years as the co-editor of the journal together with Victoria Yorke-Edwards, I have chosen to step down from my role as editor, while remaining on the Editorial Board. I had been on the Editorial Board before.

Recently I have become rather busy with work and family commitments, with only a minor involvement in academic archaeology to guarantee the time and effort that is required for running JOAD. To ensure that JOAD continues to be successful, this decision was necessary. This announcement arrives after one year of transition – we did not abandon the ship and continued publishing open archaeology datasets.

The new editors, Alessio Palmisano and Carmen Ting, will bring forward the journal’s mission with support from Anastasia Sakellariadi who has taken the very important role of editorial manager for the journal at Ubiquity Press.

As I look back to the past few years, the global scenario of open research data has changed a lot, becoming both more and more common but also more integrated with other facets of the broader open science movement, in archaeology too.

I think JOAD has a tremendous potential to improve all archaeological disciplines as an open science good practice. The peer review process is almost always a chance for authors to improve their work and the datasets they are about to publish, thanks to the many reviewers that volunteered to foster our activity. You can register now to become a reviewer in your field of specialization.

There are now other data journals that, while missing the specificity on archaeology, are geared towards a systematic habit of data sharing via data descriptor papers. This is both a challenge to the idea of a specific journal for each disciplinary field (something that mega-journals partly achieved, in the footsteps of PLOS One) and a big move towards open access publishing for research data, whatever the actual plan we choose to get there. I am convinced that the Journal of Open Archaeology Data will play its role even in this changed environment.

Joining the Advisory Board of the Journal of Open Archaeology Data

I’m joining the Advisory Board of the Journal of Open Archaeology Data.

The Journal of Open Archaeology Data (JOAD ‒ @up_joad) is an open access, peer reviewed journal for data papers describing deposited archaeological datasets. JOAD is published by Ubiquity Press, that has a

flexible publishing model makes humanities journals affordable, and enables researchers around the world to find and access the information they need, without barriers.

Ubiquity Press began publishing at University College London (UCL) and is now the largest open access publisher of UCL journals.

JOAD aims at bridging the gap between standard publishing processes and the dissemination of open data on the Web, by following existing standards (such as DOI) and pushing altogether for a novel approach to the publication of datasets, based on data papers describing the methods used to obtain and create data, the way in which it is structured and its potential for re-use by others.

As its name implies, JOAD is not a data repository: your dataset should be already deposited with one of the recommended repositories that will take care of its digital preservation. As with most open access journals, it’s the author(s) who pay for the costs involved in the publishing process, not the readers. JOAD aims at being a low-cost and effective way to disseminate your data to a wide audience, without the limitations and slowness of pre-existing publication venues.